Master of Divinity

The Master of Divinity curriculum is a four-year integrated program of formation designed to fulfill all of the requirements of the Program of Priestly Formation. The classroom is formational in addition to being academic. Professors relate their own experiences of priestly ministry (whether as priests performing the ministry or laity receiving priestly ministry) to lessons of the subject. The core curriculum offers a comprehensive presentation of the doctrine of faith. Field education offers experiences, which give context to the classroom lessons. Two internships allow the seminarian to work full-time in parish and hospital settings. Mundelein’s aim is to produce generalists with depth, who are well prepared for the duties and tasks of diocesan priesthood.

Course Offerings

DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL STUDIES AND HOMILETICS

BH503 Greek I This course consists of a careful study of the grammar and syntax of the Greek Language with emphasis on New Testament usage.

BH504 Greek II

Building on Greek I, this course moves towards readings and exegesis of selected passages.

BH511 Pentateuch and Histories

This course will integrate the sources and contents of the Pentateuch with the History of Ancient Israel. The connections between the Pentateuch and the Deuteronomic history will be studied, as well as the variant interests and theologies of the Deuteronomic history and the work of the chronicler.

BH512 Johannine Literature

Students will explore the special features, theologies, and major themes of the Gospel of John, 1, 2 and 3 John, and revelation. Emphasized: John as a “spiritual gospel,” this distinctive poetic, narrative, and symbolic cohesion and overall style of the Gospel and the other books, and impact each of the books has on readers or listeners, transforming their reception of the tradition into an encounter with the Lord.

BH512 Johannine

Students will explore the literary, historical and theological features of the Fourth Gospel, with special emphasis on the distinctive elements of John’s narrative and use of Jewish traditions (OT texts, temple feasts); attention is also given to the thematic cohesion and overall style of the Gospel and the other books (1-3 John and Revelation). An important goal is to gain a greater understanding of the Fourth Gospel (and the other books) in the Church’s tradition for the life of prayer, sacramental liturgy and pastoral ministry (e.g. lectionary, evangelization, catechesis, mystagogy).

BH513 Pauline Literature

Students will closely read the seven “authentic” letters of Paul (Philemon, 1 Thessalonians, Galatians, Philippians, Romans, and 1 & 2 Corinthians) as well as the Deutero Pauline letters (Col, Eph, Heb, 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus) as there is time. Emphasized: Paul’s strategies as a pastor, Paul’s innovative use of the letter form, Paul’s idea of justification by faith and the Lutheran / Catholic Joint Declaration, the nature of Paul’s experience on the road to Damascus, the status of Israel vis-à-vis the Church. Lodge Fall BH514 Homiletics I The goal of Homiletics I is helping seminarians develop the habit of preaching. The objective is to prepare for the diaconate and beyond, for a pastoral ministry that involves regular Sunday preaching. We will consider the specific nature of a homily, study the pastoral use of the lectionary, and learn a methodology that can be used weekly. The class will be conducted for the most part as an apprentice workshop (practice preaching, video recording, and class feedback) to develop skills of listening that allow the preacher to hear himself as the congregation hears him.

BH515 Homiletics II

The second required Homiletics course will be team-taught. The instructors will separately explain and demonstrate a single method to prepare a homily, and the students will practice the specific skills. The purpose is to teach a few helpful strategies to regular preachers for moving from the lectionary to the homily. The goal is to be fascinated by the stories in the Bible and to discover levels of meaning in images: to want to preach.

BH516/BH616

Introduction to Biblical Studies, Psalms and Wisdom This course introduces the Bible and the main topics that are essential for its interpretation: Church Teachings on Sacred Scripture, the relationship between Scripture and Tradition, the biblical world, an historical overview and timeline of the biblical period, ancient notions of authorship, inspiration, exegetical methodologies used by the Church, and literary forms and their unique manners of conveying truth. Special attention is given to the Psalms as the prayer of the Church, and to the Wisdom Literature. The constant focus of the course is on preparing students to communicate the richness of the Bible to God’s people.

BH517 Prophets

This course provides an overview of the classical biblical prophets. It pays particular attention to the prophet’s call to be God’s messengers, to their unique contributions to divine revelation, and to the distinctive and haunting style they employ to engage their contemporaries and to persuade them to adapt their views and priorities to those of their covenant God

BH620 Theology in the Psalter

This class is a study of Hebrew poetic genres as contained in the Book of Psalms. Emphasis is on reading the Psalms in their historical and literary settings. Christian usage of the Psalms in the Liturgy is also examined

BH623 Psalms

This course will provide a context for understanding more deeply these ancient poems which capture the experiences of those who choose to live radically their relationship with God. Class sessions will study the various categories of Psalms and their peculiar literary styles and functions with the goals of appreciating both their original meaning and the extended application of this meaning in contemporary times.

BH635 Word of God and Liturgy

The reforms of Vatican II called for greater consciousness of the importance of the Liturgy of the Word. The biblical concept “Word of God,” theologies of the word in patristic and modern theologians, and theological dimensions of proclamation are examined. The various means of biblical interpretation are introduced. Attention is given to the sacramental nature of the word of God. Liturgical documents dealing with the place of the lectionary and homiletics are examined in light of the relationship between word and rite in sacramental liturgy.

BH656 Roman and 1 & 2 Corinthians

Students will explore the Apostle’s pastoral strategies and abiding faith convictions through a careful reading of Paul’s most important letters. A focus will be using the texts in preaching.

BH682 Scripture, Liturgy and the New Evangelization

This course examines the relationship between the Bible and the liturgy with special reference to the proclamation and sharing of the Gospel, drawing particularly from three key sources: Scripture, the Lectionary, and the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Using the methods of biblical theology, students will examine the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, Word and Sacrament, typology and mystagogy, exegesis and doctrine, proclamation and actualization. A particular emphasis is the usefulness of these sources and methods for understanding and advancing the Church’s mission of the New Evangelization.

DEPARTMENT OF DOGMATIC THEOLOGY

DT502 Doctrine of Priesthood

This course will focus on the priest as configured to Christ the Head and Shepherd and on the munera of the priestly office that flow from this sacramental configuration. The course will review the theology of the priesthood following the structure and content of Pastores Dabo Vobis. The course will also focus on the spiritual life of the priest, highlighting the importance of the Mass and Eucharistic Adoration, praying the Liturgy of the Hours, lectio divina, spiritual reading and an appreciation of devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. An understanding of obedience, celibacy and simplicity of life for the diocesan priest will also be considered. Finally, the course will analyze the Roman Pontifical’s “ Rite of Ordination of a Priest” as a summary of the Church’s teaching on the Sacred Priesthood.

DT511 Fundamental Theology

The course examines the foundations of faith a theology. It considers the religious nature of humankind, theories of revelation and faith in conversation with the dogmatic constitution Dei Verbum, Vatican II, the development of the Christian tradition and its role in Christian life, the inspiration of Scripture, and the relationship of Christianity to other religions.

DT513 Christology and Soteriology

This course is a general introduction to the theology of the person and work of Jesus Christ. The first part of the course surveys the development of dogma of the person of Christ from Jesus’ teaching about himself to the Third Council of Constantinople. The second part of the course examines the contemporary challenge of historical-critical investigation of Scripture to the identity and saving mission of Christ and the Scriptural foundations for the doctrine of Christ as universal savior. The third part of the course surveys the development of understanding of the saving work of Christ, emphasizing the Roman Catholic understanding of the dynamics of salvation in comparison with Eastern, Protestant and contemporary pluralist soteriologies

DT514 Doctrine of God, One and Three

The purpose of this course is to study the Christian understanding of God as it has been articulated by some of the great theological figures of our tradition. The first part of the course will be an examination of the Patristic debates concerning the nature of God and a careful reading of the classical Trinitarian theologies of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas. The second section of the course will be an analysis of classical teaching in response to contemporary concerns.

DT515 Anthropology, Creation, Grace and Eschatology

This course will treat theological notions about the origin and destining of the universe and humanity. Encompassing the major themes of creation; sin, grace and eschatology, we will examine topics such as the image of God, free will and Original Sin, justification, death, judgment, heaven, hell and purgatory

DT517 Sacraments of Initiation

This course will begin with a consideration of the sacraments in general, including the topics of institution, validity, efficacy, minister and recipient, and the effects of the sacraments. Emphasis will be placed on the Trinitarian, Christological and Ecclesiological dimensions of the canonical sacraments. We will proceed to study these sacraments of initiation, baptism, confirmation, and Eucharist. Each will be considered in its biblical, historical, liturgical and canonical aspects.

DT518 Sacraments of Healing and Vocation

This course will examine the sacraments of healing (Reconciliation and Anointing) and the Sacraments at the Service of Communion (Holy Orders and Marriage). Each will be considered in its biblical, historical, liturgical and canonical aspects.

DT522 Ecumenical and Interreligious Dialogue—Pilgrimage

One of the streams of thought at the Second Vatican Council was the engagements of the Catholic Church with those outside its boundaries. In the course of the general congregations, this stream of thought took shape as a decree and two declarations. More significantly, after the council each element was given a permanent structure in the Roman Curia to foster its implementation. This course will examine the principles which direct the Catholic Church’s engagement with other Christians and other believers.

DT523 Ecclesiology and Mariology

This course will analyze the origin, nature and mission of the mystery of the Church. There will be a special emphasis on the four marks of the Church: one, holy Catholic and apostolic. The major ecclesial themes presented in the conciliar documents of the Second Vatican Council Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes will be highlighted and analyzed throughout the course. In a particular way, the Universal call to Holiness will be presented as benchmark for living the Christian life. Finally, Chapter VIII of Lumen Gentium will be offered as a guide to the Church’s rich Marian doctrine and devotion. The course will also provide a survey of the role of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the history of salvation and in the life of Christ and the Church.

DT524 Theology of Holy Orders

This course explores the theology of Holy Orders through an examination of the major documents of the Second Vatican Council, along with an historical survey of Holy Orders in the teaching of the Church. It also explores the subject through the reading of literature that portray aspects of the priesthood. The goal is to understand the identities and mission(s) of Holy Orders, and how Holy Orders fits into the context of the Body of Christ.

DT604 The Experience of the Holy Spirit

A long neglected dogmatic discipline, it deals with the nature and works of the Holy Spirit as the Third Divine Person. Only via “a universal Pneumatology does one arrive at Christology” (Karl Rahner). Only “in the Spirit” is it possible to state “Jesus is the Lord” (1 Cor 12,3). This evidences Pneumatology as a key discipline granting access to the whole of theology. Mindful of Eastern Christian impulses in this critical area, this course is ecumenical in scope and intention.

DT609 Soteriology

This course considers the dynamics of salvation in the Roman Catholic tradition. It attempts to answer the questions: How does the death and resurrection of Christ initiate a dynamic of transformation and renewal in human history? How do Christians participate in and how does the mission of the Church cultivate and apply this dynamic of transformation? Emphasis will be placed on the contemporary appropriation of the classical tradition including theological, psychological and social dimensions

DT612 Topics in Christology

This course will focus on four topics especially: the role of historical criticism of the New Testament for resolving the tension between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith; the legacy of the Council of Chalcedon for later Christology; the role of Christ’s beatific vision in the Christology of St. Thomas Aquinas; and the debate over Christology and pluralism, that is, the relation of the founders of other world religions to Christ. Other topics, though, will be allowed as research topics for the students’ final term paper, depending on their interests.

DT616 Fathers and Mothers of the Desert

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality.

DT620 Christology and Liturgical Teachings of Ratzinger/Benedict XVI

In the person of Joseph Ratzinger a man has become Pope at the beginning of the 21st Century who had already shaped the Catholic Church in the second half of the 20th century more than any other single person, save John Paul II. As university professor he directed over fifty doctoral candidates, as scholar he authored over 250 titles, as peritus he contributed in central ways to the II. Vatican Council, as archbishop he pastored a major see, and as prefect of the CDF he gave Catholic faith in her dialogue with the world a distinctive theological profile. This course will examine the origins and the gravitational centers in Pope Benedict XVI Christology. It will explore his staurocentric view and its attendant ramifications on his understanding of the nature of the Church

DT622 Priesthood and Ministry: Yesterday and Today

This course will examine the following issues: the diocesan priesthood before the council of Trent; secular involvement; distinctive lifestyle; typical ministries; the priestly charism; institutionalization; theories of essential role; women as priests; role professional knowledge and apostolate, and the priest as mystagogue.

DT629 NCTI: Global Theologies

Globalization and encounter of cultures poses new questions to theology. This course on the Church and Its Mission will survey challenges to Christology, anthropology, pneumatology and other topics with attention to apologetics, evangelism and ecumenism.

DT637 Special Topics in Christian Life

This course will allow a student to study in depth one particular topic from either the History or Theology of the Christian Tradition. Under the guidance of the professor the student will be directed to the most important facets of scholarship concerning the topic and will produce a researched response to that scholarship. The course allows for both a deeper investigation of a single topic, but also provides training in research and methodology.

DT648 Eucharist as Sacrament and Sacrifice in Roman Catholic Tradition

An investigation into Eucharist doctrine: in Scripture; the great controversies; real presence; transubstantiation; sacramental matter and form, minister, recipient and effects; the idea of sacrifice; the Eucharist and the Cross; the double consecration; epiclesis; the essence and effects of the sacrifice.

DT650 Theological Resources for Preaching

This course addresses particular issues in the theological content of preaching in light of the Second Vatican Council’s understanding of preaching as the primary duty of priests and the primary instrument of formation and catechesis in parish life. The goal of the course is to provide preachers with the tools to develop and evaluate the Biblical and theological content of the homily. The course will be structured to provide significant opportunity for practice preaching and peer review. Particular issues to be addressed include: the homily in the “new evangelization”; challenges in the effective use of the lectionary; presentation of the Christian worldview in the homily; options for structuring the homily; possibilities for evangelization in preaching outside the Sunday Mass.

DEPARTMENT OF MORAL THEOLOGY

MT512 Fundamental Moral Theology

This course is an introduction to Catholic moral theology. Scripture, Apostolic Tradition, various ecclesial traditions, and natural reason are studied in light of moral decision making. Christ is the paradigm of human action. The believer is challenged to live the faith. Virtue as a path to holiness is discussed along with fundamental concepts including: natural law, sin, double effect, scandal, material cooperation with evil, and action theory (the role of intention and the moral object in voluntary human acts).

MT514 Medical Ethics and Suffering

The medical ethics component of this course treats contemporary moral issues within the practice of medicine. End of life, artificial feeding and hydration, organ donation and transplantation, abortion, contraception, embryonic stem cell research, in vitro fertilization, cloning, and other moral relevant issues will be discussed from a moral perspective. The suffering component of this course seeks a spiritual rationale for human suffering, by examining Magisterial documents and other important writings on this topic. The aim is to construct a competing narrative to that espoused by the contemporary “culture of death,” which counsels extermination in cases where suffering greatly diminishes one’s overall quality of life.

MT516 Sexuality and Vocation

This course examines sexuality, marriage, and family from the perspective of Catholic morality. God’s nature as Trinitarian love, the person as imago dei, the intrinsic goodness of the human body (attested to by both Incarnation and Resurrection), the human vocation as self-gift, the grace of baptism, and marriage as an indissoluble spiritual sign of the union between Christ and his church, all instantiate the redemptive possibility of sex as a true language of love. At the same time, the wounds of original sin, the dividedness of the human will, and various “structures of sin” pervading modern culture instantiate the possible misuse of sex to objectify, degrade, and abuse both self and others. After clarifying the Church’s understanding of the problem and her recommended solutions, students in the course will participate in mock practice conversations with parishioners on the following topics: marriage and family life, cohabitation, adultery, homosexual acts, fornication, pornography, masturbation, contraception, and natural family planning.

MT517 Social Justice

This course explores the dignity of the human person and its practical implications for human life in society. Topics to be discussed include: war and peace, poverty and wealth, private property and the free market, the challenges of international development, stewardship of the environment, racism, domestic and community violence, and the life issues of abortion and capital punishment.

MT519 Reconciliation Practicum

The course is meant to give the soon-to-be-priest some practical experiences of the sacrament of reconciliation. The student should deepen his understanding of his role as confessor and the significance of this in his ministry as a priest. What does it mean to act in the person of Christ and absolve a penitent from his or her sins? Also, the student should acquire a pastoral sense of what the penitent expects from the sacrament.

MT616 Fathers and Mothers of the Desert

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality.

MT619 Christian Marriage An in-depth study into the historical development of Christian marriage culminating in its understanding in the 1917 Code of Canon Law. The course will also consider what lead up to the Vatican II new understanding of marriage. MT Splendor of Truth Veritatis Splendor is an encyclical of John Paul II which treats fundamental questions regarding the church’s moral teaching. This course will study these questions and other moral issues that the Pope discusses. The course will also be an in-depth analysis of the methodology that the Magisterium employs in determining proper moral behavior.

MT663 Christian Meaning of Human Suffering Human suffering has long been part and parcel of the human condition. It has been commonly accepted without any rationale. This course will seek a rationale for human suffering. It will look for a spiritual meaning in the documents of the Magisterium

MT690 Evangelium Vitae – The Gospel of Life

With abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and capital punishment part and parcel of modern day culture, the value of human life is certainly not understood. Saint John Paul II realized this and wrote his encyclical, The Gospel of Life. In this encyclical the Pope is highly critical of society’s lack of respect for human life. He writes that a culture of death prevails. In this course we will analyze the Pope’s document as he contrasts society’s values with the gospel of life.

MT Readings in Catholic Moral Theology

This course will treat either a selected area of fundamental moral theology, or special topics involving practical issues. The relevant themes will be chosen at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic.

DEPARTMENT OF SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY

ST515 Spiritual Direction

There is a growing awareness and demand in the Church today for qualified spiritual directors, people who have knowledge of the Tradition, who have experience with prayer, and who have the integrity needed to help others grow in their relationship with the Lord. In this course, we will examine the theological, technical, and practical aspects of Spiritual Direction with a specific emphasis on fostering contemplative prayer

ST517 Spiritual Theology

Spiritual Theology is that branch of theology that asks the question “What is holiness,” and covers both ascetical and mystical theology in an attempt to answer that question. This course is a systematical study of the history of spiritual theology, which looks at some of the great spiritual masters of the Church, men and women who have lived the life of holiness. It is also designed to work in conjunction with the First Year Formation program on the theology and practice of prayer

ST637 The Spanish Mystics – Directed Readings

This course explores the spiritual theology of two of the greatest Spiritual Masters: St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross. It will discuss the contributions these two saints made to our understanding of the Interior Life and how to grow in prayer and discernment. As such, this course will cover the topics usually associated with mystical theology, including the Dark Nights of the Soul, and the graces that can accompany contemplative prayer.

ST635 Word of God and the Liturgy The reforms of Vatican II called for greater consciousness of the importance of the Liturgy of the Word. The biblical concept “Word of God,” theologies of the word in patristic and modern theologians, and theological dimensions of proclamation are examined. The various means of biblical interpretation are introduced. Attention is given to the sacramental nature of the word of God. Liturgical documents dealing with the place of the lectionary and homiletics are examined in light of the relationship between word and rite in sacramental liturgy.

ST655 Prayer and Life of the Spirit: Obstacles to Evangelism

The landscape of ministry is changing rapidly. The mobility in society prevents people from putting down roots until much later in life. As a result, local communities are less stable than in the past. These trends disrupt the previous trends of church affiliation, so much so that pastors today can no longer envision their role as simply leading a local congregation. They must also understand the pastoral ministry as missionary work. This course will examine the principal obstacles to evangelism among the new generations. It will also explore what changes in the pastoral minister’s own spirituality are necessary to enable missionary pastoring.

DEPARTMENT OF CHURCH HISTORY

CH511 Formation of Catholic Tradition

This course covers papal history from Pope Pius IX through Pope John Paul II. The rise of nationalism, especially in Italy, resulted in new models of church/state relations. During the 20th century, the papacy faced the challenges of totalitarian governments – Communism, Fascism, and National Socialism. The papacy evolved in significant ways during these decades to address the challenges of the modern world. This course will examine the nature of church/state relations, the development of Catholic identity, the teaching authority of the papacy, and the renewal of intellectual and religious life in the Catholic Church during from the 19th to the early 21st century.

CH515 Medieval and Early Modern 800-1700

This course will examine primarily the development of the Church in the West from A.D. 700 to 1700. The main theme of the course will be to examine how the faith was expressed and incorporated into medieval society and how that synthesis unraveled in the early modern period. Topics include the Carolingians, the development of the papacy, the development and impact of religious movements, the missions, intellectual movements, and reform.

CH517 Modern Church History

This course covers papal history from Pope Pius IX through Pope John Paul II. The rise of nationalism, especially in Italy, resulted in new models of church/state relations. During the 20th century, the papacy faced the challenges of totalitarian governments – Communism, Fascism, and National Socialism. The papacy evolved in significant ways during these decades to address the challenges of the modern world. This course will examine the nature of church/state relations, the development of Catholic identity, the teaching authority of the papacy, and the renewal of intellectual and religious life in the Catholic Church during from the 19th to the early 21st century.


CH518 American Church History

This survey course will highlight the development of the Catholic Church in the United States from the Spanish and French missionary era (1565) to the visit of Pope John Paul II to the United States in 1979. The growth of the American Catholic community from a minority population to the largest single religious denomination in the United States is fascinating story of immigration, of institutional development, and of heroic people. The course will examine both the contributions of American Catholics to the nation and the challenges faced by American Catholics during the 19th and 20th centuries

CH616 Father and Mothers of the Desert: History and Theology

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality. Hennessey Fall CH633 Reformation and Revolution This course will survey the history of the church from 1500-1850. Particular emphasis will be placed on the responses of the Church to the challenges of the Protestants, the Nation -States, and the Enlightenment. The course will also discuss the global expansion of the Church in her missions. Other topics include: the development of the papacy, the role and impact of religious orders, reform, and intellectual and educational developments.

CH637 Special Topic in Christian Life and Thought

This course will allow a student to study in depth one particular topic from either the History or Theology of the Christian Tradition. Under the guidance of the professor the student will be directed to the most important facets of scholarship concerning the topic and will produce a researched response to that scholarship. The course allows for both a deeper investigation of a single topic, but also provides training in research and methodology. Hilliard Fall/Spring CH638 Narrators of Christian History In this course the student will explore the Christian historiographical tradition as it came into being by reading from the works of Eusebius/Rufinus, Augustine, and Bede. Furthermore this foundational tradition will be compared with a famous Catholic historian from the recent era, Christopher Dawson. The major themes to be explored are the nature and workings of God’s Providence and the relationship of Christianity to the world.

CH646 American Catholics and Political Life

Although the United States has the principle of separation of Church and state, American Catholics have always been involved in the political life of the nation. This course examines some of the pertinent church/state questions from the Civil War to Vatican II. Topics discussed include public education, the American Protective Association, the Spanish American War, the German question during World Ware I, the presidential campaign of Al Smith, Reverend Charles Coughlin, Catholics and McCarthy, and the 1960’s civil rights movement.

DEPARTMENT OF LITURGY AND MUSIC

LM510 Principles of Sacred Liturgy

An introduction to the theological and pastoral dimensions of the sacred liturgy. Topics explored include the nature of ritual and its relationship to liturgy and theology, the elements and criteria involved in the preparation and celebration of worship, and methods of liturgical catechesis, promoting active participation, and fostering New Evangelization.

LM511 Liturgical Chant I

This class deals with the basic principles of liturgical chant: an elementary examination of the musical notation, pitch and chant forms are introduced. The course focuses on vocal production and technique, pitch-matching skills, and unison singing in a pleasant voice. The basics of music theory and the fundamentals of Gregorian chant will be introduced. Preparation is made for the chanting of Psalmody, Gospel Acclamation and Sacred Scripture.

LM512 Liturgical Chant II

In this course, the fundamentals of vocal training are applied to the liturgical texts chanted by the deacon during the celebration of the Mass and other sacramental rites.

LM513 Liturgical Chant III

In this course, the fundamentals of vocal training are applied to the liturgical texts chanted by the priest during the celebration of the Mass and other sacramental rites.

LM515 Liturgical Leadership

An introduction to the role of presider in worship, the course will cover the basics of liturgical leadership and preparation for liturgy, as well those rituals at which students will preside during the pastoral internship.

LM516 Rites Practicum Through the Church’s liturgical and sacramental life the paschal mystery is made present in the lives of the faithful. This course provides background and skills necessary in the preparation of liturgical celebrations, discusses current liturgical issues, and encourages the development of the liturgical spirituality.

LM517 Mass Practicum

This course serves as a practical preparation of deacons for the celebration of the Mass following their priestly ordination. Using the Roman Missal and Lectionary, and their accompanying official documentation, students are prepared to celebrate the Eucharist with pastoral competence, to lead the assembly in the worship of God, and to preside over and regulate diaconal and lay liturgical ministries in the Mass.

LM519 Liturgical Ministry in the Hispanic Community

This course recognizes the positive values of Hispanic cultures within the Church and the importance of being sensitive to these cultures when celebrating the sacraments and in proclaiming the Word. The course will reinforce and/or improve upon the student’s basic language skills and cultural awareness. Spanish language skills not required. (Required for Chicago students and certain other dioceses.)

LM520 Liturgical Ministry in the Polish Community

This course is meant to help transitional deacons in their preparation for ministry to the Polish community. The deacons will be learning how to celebrate the sacraments in the Polish language and explore the differences in the rituals and religious cultures of Poland and the United States. The popular religiosity of Polonia will also be explored.

LM572 Choir

In this course, the fundamentals of vocal training as applied to liturgical singing is taught. The course concentrates on the beginner voice. It focuses on vocal production and technique, pitch-matching skills, sight-singing skills and unison singing in a pleasant voice. The basics of music theory and the fundamentals of Gregorian chant will be introduced. Through discussion, shared reading, practical application, and participating in a vocal ensemble, all will contribute to the appreciation of sacred music in Catholic liturgy by the class participants.

LM575 Schola

This course is for an ensemble of singers with choral competence and experience. It is designed to explore more advanced styles of singing various selections of choral music from the seminary sacred music library for worship through consistent rehearsing and participation in the liturgical/special events of the seminary.

LM576 Spanish Choir

This course is for an ensemble of singers that are interested in expanding their Spanish repertoire for bilingual liturgies. Through consistent rehearsal and participation by singing in the choir during the bilingual liturgies, a deeper awareness and understanding of the challenges of integrating Hispanic music within the weekly bilingual liturgies will be explored. This course will also assist future priests in making sound liturgical and musical decisions within their Hispanic ministry at the parish.

LM581 American Accent Practicum

This course is offered to international students who will minister in the U.S. While developing practical skills in public speaking and proclamation, students will acquire the sounds, intonation and rhythm of the Midwestern U.S. accent.

LM635 Word of God and Liturgy

The reforms of Vatican II called for greater consciousness of the importance of the Liturgy of the Word. The biblical concept “Word of God,” theologies of the word in patristic and modern theologians, and theological dimensions of proclamation are examined. The various means of biblical interpretation are introduced. Attention is given to the sacramental nature of the word of God. Liturgical documents dealing with the place of the lectionary and homiletics are examined in light of the relationship between word and rite in sacramental liturgy

LM654 Theological Resources for Preaching

This course addresses particular issues in the theological content of preaching in light of the Second Vatican Council’s understanding of preaching as the primary duty of priests and the primary instrument of formation and catechesis in parish life. The goal of the course is to provide preachers with the tools to develop and evaluate the Biblical and theological content of the homily. The course will be structured to provide significant opportunity for practice preaching and peer review. Particular issues to be addressed include: the homily in the “new evangelization”; challenges in the effective use of the lectionary; presentation of the Christian worldview in the homily; options for structuring the homily; possibilities for evangelization in preaching outside the Sunday Mass.

DEPARTMENT OF PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND CANON LAW

PT511 Theological Reflection on Catechesis and Family

In this first course of Theological Reflection, we introduce the process of describing, analyzing, and reflecting on experience using Cardijn’s methodology: see, judge, and act. Emphasis is placed on theological reflection’s transformative potential for ministry and the minister as students reflect upon particular situations from the perspective of Roman Catholic Theology as well as culture, science and common sense. The focus is on catechetical and family ministry situations. Additional material on catechesis, marriage preparation, and family is included.

PT512 Pastoral Care and Counseling

This course is designed to be a preparation for the pastoral internship. Pastoral care in a variety of settings will be explored, including marriage and family, grief and bereavement, culture, brief encounter, and crisis. In addition, the course will focus on the development and practice of the basic pastoral care skills of attending, listening, and empathy. Skills in dealing with a variety of forms of conflict are also taught and practiced. Attention to data and to personal assumptions is an additional focus.

PT513 Theological Reflection in Ministry and Parish Processes II

Students deepen their ability to analyze ministerial experience and reflect theologically on it. They begin to reflect on the theological perspectives which guide their pastoral action. Foundational perspectives are elaborated. Issues of organizing and managing are discussed.

PT514 Pastoral Internship

The pastoral internship usually takes place during the spring semester of second year. Dioceses may extend it for an entire year. Primary areas of ministerial involvement are education, pastoral care, prayer and liturgy, preaching, and adult faith life. This is a supervised, parish-based experience and ordinarily takes place in the home diocese.

PT515 Theological Reflection III on Ministry and Parish Dynamics

Pastoral ministerial experiences from the Pastoral Internship form the basis for: exploring one’s pastoral identity, skill, and style; articulating theological assumptions; and engaging in theological reflection in small groups. Verbatims from during the Internship are the primary retrieval instruments. Parish dynamics are also reviewed. A paper developing the theology present in one’s ministry is required.

PT516 Parish Skills

This course is an introduction to understanding and developing skills which will enhance the pastoral ministry of parish priests. The first part of the course focuses on the practice of evangelization. The second part is concerned with situations of conflict and employing practical principles to interact collaboratively with others involved in light of the Catholic Tradition to resolve the situation.

PT517 Clinical Pastoral Education

C.P.E. takes place in the summer following Second Theology and pastoral internship. In this full-time chaplaincy internship, the student puts into practice the theological

knowledge and pastoral skills he has acquired. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating abilities to clearly articulate the faith, to attend pastorally to others, to work in team relationships, and to seek and receive feedback. This experience is usually in a hospital in an ecumenical setting.

PT518 Parish Administration and Leadership

This course focuses on the role of the pastor. How does a pastor fashion a gospel vision and implement it in all aspects of parish life? We look at leadership styles and how those styles are manifested in a parish setting and their impact on the parish community. Issues include prayer and liturgy, education, outreach and evangelization, business and finance, generational ministerial issues, stewardship, personnel decisions, planning, follow-up, evaluation, pastoring multiple and diverse parishes, pastoring in urban and rural settings, etc. Input from outside sources is obtained, and feedback from lived experience is explored.

PT525 Evangelization, Missiology and Culture

The course will focus on a theology of evangelization and mission and the various ways that evangelization is understood and practiced in the diverse contexts and cultures of our dioceses and seminarians. Relevant Church documents regarding the issues of Evangelization, Mission and Culture are studied. The principles of the interaction of unity and diversity in the Church are addressed. The critical importance of knowing one’s own cultural assumptions and how they relate to the cultural assumptions of others are explored.

PT527 Canon Law I

This first course in Canon Law treats briefly the history of Canon Law up to and including the Revised Code. The first three Books of the Code are discussed: General Norms, the People of God, the Teaching Office of the Church.

PT528 Canon Law II

This second required course in Canon Law treats all the Sacraments, including the Sacrament of Matrimony, from the canonical perspective. In addition, the Temporal Goods of the Church and Sanctions in the Church are discussed.

PT610 Cross-Cultural Ministry

This course is designed to engage the students in the study of the phenomenon of ministry in culturally diverse faith communities in the United States including ministry as the pastor of multiple parishes, pastor of one parish with multiple sites, the pastor of one parish with multiple cultures and languages, and the pastor of parishes with competing cultures. The express purpose of the course is to provide students with foundational information and skills for pastoring in these complex circumstances. The sessions will focus on the current research from the field of pastoral ministries to, with, for and within culturally diverse faith communities in the United States and the identification of effective pastoral strategies for shepherding these culturally diverse faith communities. This class is a Significant Pastoral Issues Elective.

PT633 Canonical Preparation for Marriage

This course addresses various canonical and pastoral problems which the minister faces in preparing couples for marriage. The canonical forms of each diocese are explained, and various pastoral approaches used in instructing engaged couples will be analyzed.

PT654 Theological Resources for Preaching

This course addresses particular issues in the theological content of preaching in light of the Second Vatican Council’s understanding of preaching as the primary duty of priests and the primary instrument of formation and catechesis in parish life. The goal of the course is to provide preachers with the tools to develop and evaluate the Biblical and theological content of the homily. The course will be structured to provide significant opportunity for practice preaching and peer review. Particular issues to be addressed include: the homily in the “new evangelization”; challenges in the effective use of the lectionary; presentation of the Christian worldview in the homily; options for structuring the homily; possibilities for evangelization in preaching outside the Sunday Mass.

PT678 Advanced Pastoring of Multiple/Diverse Parishes

This course is designed to engage the students in the study of the phenomenon of ministering to multiple and/or diverse parishes in the United States including ministry as the pastor of multiple parishes, pastor of one parish with multiple sites, and the pastor of one parish with multiple ethnic faith communities. The express purpose of the course is to provide students with foundational information and skills for pastoring in these complex circumstances. The sessions will focus on the current research from the field of multiple parish ministry as well as ministry in culturally diverse parishes in the United States and the identification of effective pastoral strategies. This class is a both a Cross-Cultural and Significant Pastoral Issues Elective.